Tag Archives: mindset

My COVID Isolation challenge, with credit to “75 hard”

Apparently, I’m may be the last person on the planet to hear about the 75 hard challenge. I’m now reading several bloggers who are doing this challenge and writing about the benefits they see. It sounded intriguing, particularly during the COVID -19 pandemic, when everything has been so upended. So, after further research and consideration, I’ve climbed onto this bandwagon. I think it will help me address some of the habits I’ve developed to cope with stress and calm feelings of vulnerability.  

I am, however, on a modified version of the challenge. Yes, purists will tell me that you cannot change the challenge and still be doing the challenge. Phooey. My modifications make the parameters more relevant for me under the current constraints of working, working out, and maintaining a household in times of COVID (without a gym!).

What is the 75 Hard challenge?

A Google search will tell you about all you need to know about the challenge. I don’t want to link it here because, frankly, the initial presentation is hard to listen to. I’m no prude to f-bombs, but it is extremely distracting to repeat any word that often. And it makes the speaker sound unprofessional. Listen at your own risk. I’d recommend reading about it instead.

But briefly, 75 hard is touted as a mental and physical challenge that involves 5 parts. They suggest that the point of this challenge is to develop all kinds of positive outcomes, such as improved confidence, self-esteem, perseverance, and resilience. Sounds miraculous, doesn’t it!?! I get it — pushing yourself to stay committed to high goals, even when it gets hard or uncomfortable, changes you, arguably for the better. This is the ultimate goal of the challenge. But there are lots of ways to get to the same end.

So the 5 parts.

1 — Drink a gallon of water a day. Only count plain, clear water.

2 — Do a diet of choice. No alcohol or cheat meals.

3 — Exercise two times a day for 45 minutes each time. One session must be outside.

4 — Read 10 pages of a book on non-fiction.

5 — Take a progress photo every day.

All parts, every day, for 75 days in a row. If you skip any one element on a given day, the challenge is restarted on day 1. Seems harsh, but this consequence is intended to keep one on track.

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My version of the challenge

So here are the parameters for my challenge, based on 75 hard. Sorry, purists. This is my deal, and I have good reasons for changing things up. I’d like to do some type of challenge that will test me, make me fitter, and help improve some habits, without throwing me into a tailspin trying to complete some seemingly arbitrary rules. Perhaps I cannot call it the 75 hard challenge though. Maybe COVID Isolation challenge is more appropriate?

Water

I already drink a lot of water. It’s summer. I get thirsty and drink, but I don’t monitor it. Some days I need more, some days less. Plus, there is nothing magical about drinking a gallon of water/day. However, I put a gallon of water in the refrigerator and use that throughout the day for this challenge. My aim is to empty the container.

A bigger challenge for me is to eliminate diet soda. My consumption has gone up during the pandemic—a lot. I’ve wanted to cut back, but haven’t been able to do so. This challenge leads me to cut it out completely.

Diet

I don’t do traditional diets anymore because that ultimately leads to disordered eating for me. But I did want to make some changes to my eating habits. Clean things up a bit, if you will. First, I am cutting out noshing between meals. I found that I was mindlessly reaching for between-meal snacks every time I passed the pantry, typically out of boredom or frustration with my work. I’m eating for reasons other than hunger, and I’d like to curb that habit.

Secondly, I’m eliminating sugary or overly processed food for 75 days. My spouse is on a Hostess cupcake kick — mainly because he’s running 6-10 miles a day. I really shouldn’t be joining him on this kick. I’m hoping that between this and cutting out noshing, I will develop some better, sustainable habits, long term.

I already don’t drink alcohol very often. So check that one off the list.

Exercise 

My modification is to work out once daily for 75 days without a day off. This is where I depart from the original challenge most significantly. I simply cannot work out twice daily every day. My main exercises during this pandemic are cycling and swimming. Cycling takes at least 2 hours for me to prep and ride — and that’s a light ride. Tack on even more time if I have to drive someplace. Swimming takes nearly as long since I have to drive to and from the pool and shower afterward. I get the lane for an hour under the current COVID restrictions, and I have to maximize that time. Adding another 45-minute workout on top of either of those and I’m looking at a bare minimum of 3 hours between all of the logistics. So, doing this twice a day? I’d be setting myself up for failure from the start. Also, I’m older and (active) recovery days are critical to helping prevent injury. The dogs won’t mind an extra walk on those days. 

Reading 10 pages of non-fiction

I already read primarily non-fiction material, but I skip around between books. So I will only read 1 book at a time to improve my focus and retention.

Picture — one photo daily

This one is harder than it sounds. I never get in pictures. Fat people rarely do. While you really can’t see progress daily, this part of the challenge might make me less sensitive to seeing myself in pictures. It’s forcing me to look at myself every day and learn to appreciate what I have.

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My plan is to report back periodically and describe any significant observations. I’m thinking of posting pictures at the halfway point in early September.

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I see this challenge as a kind of a game that may help me undo habits that have emerged recently (noshing on sweets, drinking diet soda, skipping workouts). These are unhealthy crutches I’ve used, mainly to deal with working at home during the pandemic. But they slow my fitness progress and keep me stuck in place. While the challenge may be hard, it really is a way for me to re-focus my efforts to get fitter and develop a better mindset. In more a typical year, I’d be training for specific events. This year, I’m training for life.  

So no, it’s not 75 hard in the “pure” form, but rather it’s a meaningful challenge that won’t overly stress me. There’s enough to deal with at this point, and I can’t afford to fall back into dysfunctional behaviors.

Photo by Rollalyn Ruis on Unsplash